This is not a sales pitch

This is not a sales pitch. This is a confession. But this is not a confessional: I have nothing to be ashamed of. In May Test Centre will release my second collection of poems. It’s been six years since I published How to Build a City. It is an understatement to say that I haveContinue reading “This is not a sales pitch”

Two early reviews of Flood Drain

Chivers’ Flood Drain speaks in many voices: some are beautiful, some are demotic and, pulled together, they achieve a confluence, like the Humber and the Hull, like the past and the present. John Field, ‘Find the River’ and Very different from the ambitious Medieval allegorical world of Langland’s dream poem this witty and intelligent take onContinue reading “Two early reviews of Flood Drain”

Mutant River: Messing around on the Hull

In the opening of the great medieval dream vision Piers Plowman, the narrator lies down ‘on a brood bank by a bourne syde’ and is sent to sleep by the sound of the stream which, as he says ‘sweyed so murye’. The poem registers a universal truth, that there is something mesmeric about running water,Continue reading “Mutant River: Messing around on the Hull”

Seamus Heaney’s Human Touch

It’s fair to say that Heaney stood apart from many of the innovations of modern poetry, but he was a master of breath, and of the poised line-ending. His poems are always clean and efficient, but with sounds that leap off the page: his was a poetry of speaking, of a gently turned vernacular. TheyContinue reading “Seamus Heaney’s Human Touch”

Five new dates for The Walbrook Pilgrimage

Part historical/cultural research project, part exercise in acute environmental observation, Chivers’ ode to the Walbrook – “ghost and friend of the City” – is an immersive, beautifully executed exercise in urban psychogeography. (Wild Culture) If you missed the initial, sold-out run of The Walbrook Pilgrimage, it’s your lucky day – I am leading five moreContinue reading “Five new dates for The Walbrook Pilgrimage”

The Circus of Poetry: from Clowning to the Taming of the Lion

Three years ago I edited and published a collection of essays exploring new approaches to poetry. Stress Fractures is currently on sale for just five of your English pounds, so as a further temptation I am making my introduction to the book freely available right here. I envisaged the collection as a means of provokingContinue reading “The Circus of Poetry: from Clowning to the Taming of the Lion”

Poetry and the boundaries of plagiarism

I’m fascinated by this recent story. Christian Ward, a 32-year old poet from London with whom I’ve communicated occasionally on social networking, has been found to have plagiarised a poem by Helen Mort (whom I also know – in the real world). Christian’s poem, ‘The Deer’, won a local poetry competition in Devon, where theContinue reading “Poetry and the boundaries of plagiarism”

Random Acts

Tonight – Tuesday 2 October – my poetry made its TV debut on Channel 4’s  Random Acts. My poem ‘The Event’ has been turned into an animated short film by the horrendously talented New York-based artist Julia Pott. Here it is above, on Vimeo. I think she’s done a great job of bringing the poem,Continue reading “Random Acts”

For sale: two meticulously hand-inscribed hardback copies of How To Build a City

I’ve spent the morning inscribing two copies of my first book How To Build a City with detailed notes about the poems. These notes range from clarifications of references and obscure allusions (many to London history) to thoughts about the contexts of the poems. I have also provided some very candid insights  about the moreContinue reading “For sale: two meticulously hand-inscribed hardback copies of How To Build a City”